Five Things: Books
These are the books I’ve read lately that I recommend for everybody to read also. I initially thought of making a list of standalone books but screw it, Parasite by Mira Grant was so nerve wracking I had to include it. All of my book reviews are on Goodreads so these are just the books’ synopsis in my own words and to whom I recommend it.

1. Night Film by Marisha Pessl tells a story of an investigative journalist, Scott McGrath, who is haunted by an obscure film director, Stanislas Cordova, after braving to investigate about his daughter’s death. He goes through a series of events that makes him question if there are really boundaries between reality and fantasy. Later on finding out that there actually is, and that is horror. 

Recommended readers: If you are feeling a bit Sherlock-y and are not weirded out by witchcraft or are willing to try something a bit unrealistic, this one’s for you.

2. Wonder by R.J. Palacio is a tearjerker. Well, at least that’s what it was for me. Wonder is the story of an ordinary boy named August who lives an extraordinary life. Having been born with a physical deformality, he and his whole life have been treated differently by the people around him. What I love about this book is other characters, even the small ones, get to have their own point of views. A unique addition to an already unique book.

Recommended readers: Those who are looking for a light read but a meaningful one, grab this book now.

3. Parasite (Parasitology #1) by Mira Grant is a futuristic book. Set in 2027, it’s about tapeworms being a new medical innovation that can help everyone’s medical needs without taking pills, medicines, etc. But things go wrong when they found out that these tapeworms have finally decided to invade their hosts’ mind and live their own lives in their hosts’ body. Only Sally Mitchell, an amnesiac that has an implanted tapeworm, shows no sign of the disease and may help to solve the chaos that can possibly erase humanity on the face of the Earth.

Recommended readers: People who love thrillers who also have a knack for science, or not. Also people who are willing to read scientific stuff that may or may not be real.

4. Tampa by Alissa Nutting is narrated by a middle school teacher, Celeste Price, who is sexually aroused by middle school boys. You know what, that’s all you have to know about this book. This book, as I have said, is an eye opener. Literally and figuratively.

Recommended readers: Open minded people.

5. The Circle by Dave Eggers is also a futuristic book. Mae Holland, the protagonist, got a job at The Circle, a company that focuses in technological innovation. While reading the book, I myself was so fascinated by the ideas they develop. There she learns all about the company’s main agenda: transparency. Which is a good thing, right? Only it’s not. The story starts from being amazing to horrifying.

Recommended readers: Anyone who wants to see what the near future is like.

Five Things: Books

These are the books I’ve read lately that I recommend for everybody to read also. I initially thought of making a list of standalone books but screw it, Parasite by Mira Grant was so nerve wracking I had to include it. All of my book reviews are on Goodreads so these are just the books’ synopsis in my own words and to whom I recommend it.

1. Night Film by Marisha Pessl tells a story of an investigative journalist, Scott McGrath, who is haunted by an obscure film director, Stanislas Cordova, after braving to investigate about his daughter’s death. He goes through a series of events that makes him question if there are really boundaries between reality and fantasy. Later on finding out that there actually is, and that is horror. 

Recommended readers: If you are feeling a bit Sherlock-y and are not weirded out by witchcraft or are willing to try something a bit unrealistic, this one’s for you.

2. Wonder by R.J. Palacio is a tearjerker. Well, at least that’s what it was for me. Wonder is the story of an ordinary boy named August who lives an extraordinary life. Having been born with a physical deformality, he and his whole life have been treated differently by the people around him. What I love about this book is other characters, even the small ones, get to have their own point of views. A unique addition to an already unique book.

Recommended readers: Those who are looking for a light read but a meaningful one, grab this book now.

3. Parasite (Parasitology #1) by Mira Grant is a futuristic book. Set in 2027, it’s about tapeworms being a new medical innovation that can help everyone’s medical needs without taking pills, medicines, etc. But things go wrong when they found out that these tapeworms have finally decided to invade their hosts’ mind and live their own lives in their hosts’ body. Only Sally Mitchell, an amnesiac that has an implanted tapeworm, shows no sign of the disease and may help to solve the chaos that can possibly erase humanity on the face of the Earth.

Recommended readers: People who love thrillers who also have a knack for science, or not. Also people who are willing to read scientific stuff that may or may not be real.

4. Tampa by Alissa Nutting is narrated by a middle school teacher, Celeste Price, who is sexually aroused by middle school boys. You know what, that’s all you have to know about this book. This book, as I have said, is an eye opener. Literally and figuratively.

Recommended readers: Open minded people.

5. The Circle by Dave Eggers is also a futuristic book. Mae Holland, the protagonist, got a job at The Circle, a company that focuses in technological innovation. While reading the book, I myself was so fascinated by the ideas they develop. There she learns all about the company’s main agenda: transparency. Which is a good thing, right? Only it’s not. The story starts from being amazing to horrifying.

Recommended readers: Anyone who wants to see what the near future is like.

Likes & reblogs:

  1. seralovesjohnj reblogged this from trinaflores and added:
    I’ve read Tampa so far and going to get the other four today!
  2. trinaflores posted this